a string quilt block tutorial – paper pieced method

I’m so blown away by all the wonderful comments on my string quilt, now aptly named ‘Kaleidoscope’ (many thanks to Kerri who was the first to suggest it, followed by 9 others of you who had the same thought!) I think it’s just perfect.

And now, a quick tutorial – I had a few requests for a tutorial on making this type of quilt, so I figured I’d oblige (it’s the least I can do, right?). This shows the paper piecing method, which is my preferred method.

To start, you’ll want to decide on the size of your blocks. For the Kaleidoscope quilt, my blocks were 11″ square. In this tutorial, I’m using 7″ square blocks. I use cheap copy paper, but you could use anything you have on hand – I’ve heard pages from phone books work! – just as long as it’s not a heavyweight paper.

Cut squares of your desired size from the copy paper and set aside.

Decide on your fabrics and cut strips of a variety of widths. I cut strips of 1″ – 2.5″. I like the way it looks with a variety of widths, but you could also cut strips all the same width if you’d prefer. Set these aside.

fabric-strips1

I wanted to have a small strip of white separate the squares in my quilt, so I cut 1″ strips of a solid white fabric. You could opt for any other solid color – I used green in this baby quilt, or you could use one patterned fabric to tie everything together, or you could skip it completely.

Next we’ll temporarily attach the white strips to the paper squares. With the fabric right side up, lay the strip diagonally on the block. I use a little glue from a glue stick to dab on the back of the fabric strip so it will stick to the paper. You want to make sure that each strip is centered on the diagonal so that your strips will line up with you sew the blocks together. I eyeball mine (’cause I’m lazy!) but you may want to use a ruler and draw a pencil line through the diagonal to help with placement.

paper-squares-with-strips

Now you can start sewing on your fabric strips! The first strip should be long enough to cover the section of paper right next to the piece glued on the diagonal. You’ll lay your first strip right side down on top of the strip glued to the block.

attach-first-strip

(please ignore my wrinkly fabric! I’m not much for ironing!)

Align the edges and sew with a 1/4″ seam allowance. Very important: be sure to reduce your stitch length! This will allow you to easily remove the paper from the back later. My machine is typically set at 2.5 – I’ve found that reducing it to 1.5 works well.

sew-strip

Sew along this edge (right through the paper), then iron open with a dry iron. (some may want to skip the ironing, and just finger press – that’s up to you).

first-strip-sewn

Repeat this process, aligning another strip to the strip you just attached, again, right sides together.

attach-second-stri

Iron open and repeat until you’ve covered the entire paper square. It will look something like this.

pre-trimmed-block

Now you can flip the square over so you can see the paper square on the back. Using your clear ruler and rotary cutter, trim the excess fabric, using the paper square as a guide.

trim-block

And now you’ve completed your first block! I leave the paper on my blocks until I have them all completed.

finished-block

Repeat for all your paper squares. Then you can arrange them as you like -

four-blocks

When you have your blocks completed, you’ll want to remove the paper from the back. If you’ve reduced the stitch length, the paper should appear almost perferated. I fold the paper along the stitch line and then tear away.

Sew your blocks together and admire your lovely quilt top!

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228 Responses to a string quilt block tutorial – paper pieced method

  1. 1
    Mal* says:

    Thanks for the tutorial! Bookmarky bookmarky. I really think that white stripe in the middle is what makes your quilt great. I mentioned before that I tend to not like string quilts but your Kaleidoscope is just gorgeous.

  2. 3
    Kristy says:

    Love your color combinations. What a great tutorial! I wondered how paper piecing was done. Thanks =)

  3. 4

    I agree with Mal. The white stripe is like the whipped cream on top of the banana split–perfect. Thanks for the tutorial.

  4. 5
    Holly says:

    Thank you so much for this tutorial, I never understood what the point of the paper piecing was. It really makes everything line up I see. I really want to give this a try! Your Kaleidoscope quilt is just lovely, like all your wonderful quilts! Did you ever think about starting your own Etsy shop?! You’re amazing handmades would be a sure hit! =D

  5. 6
    Sue says:

    Thanks for the tutotial, I’ve heard of using muslin on the back, like this better. Love your work!

  6. 7
  7. 8
    heather says:

    Thanks for that!! Great job. I think I’m going to give this a try!:)

  8. 9
    Jenny says:

    Thank you thank you thank you! I have looked at every tutorial I could find and paper piecing never clicked until yours. Great pictures, too, as usual :) And Kaleidoscope couldn’t be a more perfect name!

  9. 10
    Leslie says:

    Thanks so much for the tutorial! I can’t wait to try it.

  10. 11
    Rachel says:

    Thanks for the tutorial! I was wondering why people use this method. I need all the help I can get lining things up!

  11. 12
    Ann-Marie says:

    oh yeah!!!
    I love alllllllll your quilts, and this one is beyond cool!
    thanks for posting this!!

  12. 13
    aimee says:

    Thanks for the tutorial! I couldn’t work out how you perfectly centered the white… I love your quilt – beautiful!!!

  13. 14
    willy-nilly says:

    Wondering about the white too? Amazing quilt and another to add to the list.

  14. 15

    Thanx for this. I’m thinking I might actually make one of these because it’s kinda mindless sewing. And I loved reading your directions…I think we’re similar “relaxed” quilters. :)

  15. 16
    Whitney says:

    I was surprised to find myself reading this intently like I might actually do it…and now I’m surprised to be admitting this to you! Impressed that you may have converted me? Well, you should be.

  16. 17
    Sara says:

    Oh thank you! I’ve been sitting here for days wondering, how did she do that?

    And now I know! Thanks again!!

  17. 18
    Beth says:

    I was also curious to know how you made something so beautiful – thanks for sharing your technique. Your directions are so clear and straightforward. I may have to give something like this a try. I also really like the idea of sewing with paper!

  18. 19
    Sonja says:

    Thank you soooo much for your tuto!!!

  19. 20
    Casey says:

    thank you for the tutorial!!

  20. 21
    Leigh says:

    beautiful! And it makes so much sense! I KNEW I was saving my scraps from some good reason…

  21. 22
    hannita says:

    Can I just say that I have read about 5 tutorials on how to do this and this is the very first time it made any sense? Thanks for that!

  22. 23
    Kate Dixon says:

    Thank you for the tutorial. Your blocks love gorgeous, they colourswork perfectly together.

  23. 24
    Rachel says:

    I like this one, very pretty! I’m all about cramming as many different fabrics in as I can, I can never discriminate! I’ll be linking.

  24. 25
    Ellen says:

    Thank you Thank you! An easy tutorial for a great scrap user!

  25. 26
    Allison says:

    Thank you for the tutorial, I love love love this quilt. Its on my quilting to do list next. :)

  26. 27
    AntipodeanJulie says:

    I love paper piecing and do most of my patching / quilt tops this way.

    I also love reading all the different ways people use it and explain it.

    One thing I’ve always found useful not matter which pattern is to use a bigger size needle in the sewing machine. It makes the paper holes bigger, increasing the perforations and gives more wriggle room, letting the papers be removed easier (and therefore not putting the stitches under any stress). I think I read it years ago in a magazine (way before all these blogs!) tried it and found it worked!!

    I love your white strip and am eager to go sew together a jelly roll incorporating the dividing stripe now. Thank!!

  27. 28
    Kelly says:

    Thank you for the tutorial!!
    I can’t wait to try this out, when i have enough scraps that is!

  28. 29
    Sophia says:

    This is wonderful quilt! Thank you for the tutorial!!!

  29. 30
    elektra says:

    Thank you so much for this tutorial! I’ll try this method this evening. Your Kaleidoscope quilt looks so modern and fresh – just great!

  30. 31
    Zarah says:

    Stupid question… what is the benefit of paper piecing vs. just sewing the strips together?

    • 32
      admin says:

      The paper piecing provides a foundation and can help stabilize fabrics. I find it helpful because there’s no need to measure your strips – you already know the area you need to cover. It also allows for more precision, especially if you’re creating a quilt similar to the one I’ve shown that has one constant color running through it – by using the paper, you know exactly where the fabric needs to end up. That being said, it certainly is possible to just sew the strips together… I happen to really like the paper piecing though!

  31. 34
    Jackie says:

    Thanks for the tutorial! I think I see a string baby quilt in my future.

  32. 35
    vanessa says:

    muito lindoooooo
    parabénssss

  33. 36
    Jenna Z says:

    When I strip quilt, I use muslin squares instead of paper. No paper to tediously rip off and you get the same stability and helpful strip placement guide. :)

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  35. 39
    joanie says:

    This is beautiful, so inspiring. Apart from the central white strip, it looks like there’s no need to be particular about which fabrics you use, just throw them together – I love that!

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  37. 40
    amandajean says:

    thanks for the tutorial! i’m hoping to start one of these today!

  38. 41
    Kerry says:

    What a great way to use up scraps! Thanks for the tutorial.

  39. 42

    The quilt is beautiful, and this paper piecing technique looks like a lot of fun! I am thinking this will be my next quilt, thanks so much for the tutorial! I just recently found your blog, I am really enjoying it : D

  40. 43
    Whitney says:

    Love it!! I started my first quilt when I was in my early teens and it was a paper pieced string quilt…now I’m 22 and still have yet to bind it…need to get on that. Your photos are beautiful and inspired me to dig out my old quilt and finish it :)

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  42. 44
    Erin says:

    Thank you for the tutorial! I’m going to make one.

  43. 45
    delaneysduds says:

    so cool! I will definitely use this method!

  44. Pingback: Unveiling.. « Thursday Rendezvous

  45. 46

    Thanks so much for this tutorial — I used it for a very small project to test it out because I wanted to so quickly!
    Blogged: http://thursdayrendezvous.wordpress.com/2009/05/09/unveiling/

    Thanks!

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  47. 47
    Susan says:

    Love it, and I had to try it. I’m so pleased with your tutorial, and I’m happy with how my pillow turned out! Thanks!

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  49. 48
    Sandy says:

    Nice tutorial. Although I have to admit I would never use paper …. it’s so ugh to remove and can cause the block to get wonky. You can sprits the paper, wait a minute and then remove. I just use thin fabric … I’ve made a ton of string quilts. Love your blog … I want to give the bento idea a try. Thanks.

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  51. 49
    jackie says:

    Hi I used pages from an old telephone book, very thin and easy to remove, fun quilt, great results without hard thinking about color! thanks

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  53. 50
    Pat says:

    Hi All, I love making these string-quilt blocks-sometimes they are called “sew & flip” blocks. I have made quite a few quilts this way–I use squares of bleached or unbleached muslin to sew the strips onto. that way I don’t have to remove anything, and it works well for me. It also gives a little more support so I can use a thinner batting. thank you very much for all your sites, I love learning new ways to do things.

  54. 51

    Hi There! I just wanted to say I love this quilt! I’m currently working on it (as my first quilt ever!) I linked back to this post on my blog (thedabblingcrafter.blogspot.com). Keep up the beautiful quilts!

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  56. 52

    Paper piecing never made sense to me in any of the tuts I’ve read. I thought it was a waste of time and something I’d never want to do.

    HOWEVER – this tutorial changed my mind forever! I love the idea of knowing exactly where to cut your strips off on the back and the easy way you explained this. I cannot wait to go try it out! Thanks for the inspiration and the simple illustrations. :)

  57. 53
    Rachel says:

    Hi Ashley,
    I am using your tutorial to make a string quilt. It is so easy! Thanks for the great instructions. I posted the first few blocks on my blog.
    Rachel

  58. 54
    Alicia says:

    Thank you for the tutorial! I saw your Kaleidiscope quilt and instantly fell in love with it. I started making one last night and will let you know when I finish it. Thanks for sharing your expertise!

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  60. 55
    HeatherL says:

    Thanks so much for the fantastic tute! I wanted to try paper piecing for a complex project but thought I’d never find a good explanation. The other projects I’ve found online have been strange animal shapes I am quite sure I’ll never do….this is fun, purposeful, and creates a beautiful result!

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  62. 56
    Sharon Young says:

    Thanks for the tutorial! Now that I have actually seen how to do it, I can’t wait to work on my stash! Seeing it in pictures makes paper piecing seem much easier to do than I thought!

  63. 57
    Julie says:

    Bookmarked! Thanks for the tutorial. I am going to start on mine today.

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  65. 58
    Deb in AZ says:

    My niece sent me one of those page a day calendars for C-mas. I’ve been saving each page as it is torn off daily. Now I know what to do with all the pages- use them for a string quilt foundation! Each page is about 6″ square, perfect size for my shorter scraps. With 365 pages there will be a couple nice large throw string quilts in the future! (One for my niece too).
    Thanks for the tut!

  66. 59
    Leanne says:

    Thanks for that I have not visited you before but love the quilt. Thanks for sharing.

  67. 60
    Betty says:

    Thanks so much for this tutorial. I’m almost finished with my first baby sized one and I love the pretty design! I’m using muslin instead of paper. It’s adding a nice weight to the cotton fabrics. I live in a hot climate so I always just use flannel on the backs of my quilts and no batting. The muslin is giving it just that extra weight that it needs. Thanks very much for these easy to follow instructions!

  68. 61
    deb says:

    When I first started quilting -27 years ago- we called this pattern “brain dead” quilting because it could be worked on those evening when life was so challenging that you couldn’t think – you were mentally brain dead.

    It’s a great ongoing project.. and one of my favorite string quilts.

    Putting this one in my list for a future BlogHer post.

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  70. 62
    Kristi says:

    Your Kaleidoscope quilt is one of my favorite quilts ever–I love how the thin strips of white make the colors pop. Thanks for the fab tutorial. I can’t wait to try it!

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  74. 63
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  78. 64
    Gail says:

    My bee group’s 2010 block exchange is a string block, which is a new technique for some. May I please print and distribute your excellent tutorial for our bee members?

  79. 65
    christine says:

    oh my… thanks for this. you just made a beginners day.

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  81. 66
    Anita says:

    I am beginner and have not made a quilt yet but did make an “Ohio Star” block. I would like to try this but have a question. What about frayed edges? Are the strips turned under?

  82. 67
    elisa hernandez says:

    Wow, thanks so much for walking me through this. I will be trying this with my mom…were going to have a great time.

  83. Pingback: Tutorial Tuesday: Strung out! « A Quilt A Day

  84. 68
    Katie Trott says:

    love this! I was wondering why there was a white scrap of fabric down the middle – now that it’s finished, I see! I’m guessing that this is the “rope” part. I just love finding a way to use my scraps :D

  85. Pingback: an Anna Maria Horner string quilt, in voile – Film in the Fridge

  86. 69
    Meg says:

    Ashley, I know I’m late to the party on these, but I finally tried out a few of these for a mini swap this month. Oh gosh, these are addictive!!! And is it just me, or do strings seem to multiply instead of decrease, the more of these blocks you make?

  87. 70
    Mallory says:

    These are beautiful – thank you so much for sharing this tutorial!

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  90. 71
    maureen wynne says:

    I just love this technique. Have made several using scraps of fabric given to me by others and also my own. After showing my friends what I made I don’t think they will be handing me their scraps anymore. I also used a black and a cream side by side in the centre. this gives a lovely double diamond, light and dark effect when finished. I love it.

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  94. 72
    Minette says:

    Thanks , this is a great tutorial!

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  96. 73
    Ladypennyjane says:

    I made a quilt as you go reversible string quilt, where instead of piecing onto paper you cut squares of batting instead and sewed strips on both sides at the same time, which had the same effect but you have to be careful with the colour choices as double sided these babies can be a bit much!

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  104. 74
    Shara says:

    I have been saving my left over strips and bits for a while, now I have a great pattern to use them on thanks to your tutorial! I plan on whipping up some of these quilts for my nieces and newphews for Christmas this year!

  105. 75
    Linda says:

    Thank you for your very clear Tutorial. I have just completed a String Quilt, following your instructions but using squares cut from an old white cotton nightie and pillowcase for the base. Thrilled with the result which you can find on Flickr under Koshka2.

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  111. 76
    Kristin says:

    My daughter has been requesting, bugging really, that i teach her to quilt. We started with your tutorial. While she ended up getting tired after 4 blocks, we came up with a creative solution, her school bag. Check out her tote here. http://thecraftyquilter.blogspot.com/2010_08_01_archive.html#8103312914287884292
    Thanks for your inspiration!

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  115. 77

    Hi, I love making these, they ARE so addictive, mindless fun stitching.

    Since I hate tearing out paper I’ve now been using a really inexpensive muslin or even an ugly/thin fabric that snuck into my stash (but on the wrong side so colors don’t show thru) as the foundation for the strings. It makes for a nice soft yet secure base for the strings.

    Love your tutorial, keep em coming.

    warm quilt hugs, sue in CA

  116. 79
    Ellen Hurd says:

    Love this! Thank you!

  117. Pingback: A few Works in Progress… | Squares and Triangles

  118. 80
    Molly says:

    I love how easy this looks.. I mean, not incredibly easy like a four piece block quilt.. but pretty simple! And the finished product is so intricate. Can’t wait to try with all my leftover pieces. Kudos for such a great idea.

    -Molly
    Antique Jewelry

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  125. 81

    Thank you for sharing this – I have just started on my own bedspread.

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  127. 82
    Elise Klink says:

    Thanks-I realize now I had no clue what paper piecing was before! This makes so much more sense than what I saw in my head! :)

  128. 83
    Elizabeth says:

    I love string piecing quilts.It is a wonderful way to use up scrap strips and pieces of fabric.I found using leftover squares of cotton flannelette, or even light colored cottons as a base for the string pieces worked out even better than paper, because you have an “instant” battin for a summer weight or decorative quilt, or if making a quilt for warmth, you only have to add a really thin batting or another layer of flannelette as a batting.

  129. 84
    Vivian says:

    How do you quilt these when you sew the squares together??? I love to hand quilt.

  130. 85
    camila says:

    It’s a wonderful quilt, but it takes a lot of time and effort, hope it looks as good as yours, or at least good, hahaha, thanks for the tutorial

  131. 86
    Joan says:

    I am new to quilting and I am doing this one. Love the idea of the white in the center. Thanks so much for your information.

  132. 87
    Geraldine says:

    Thank you so much for this turorial, I am going to try in so I can start to use up my never ending mound of scraps.

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  136. 88
    Zuhal says:

    Wonderful tutorial, thank you so much for it! I tried it and made 7 blocks, just to see that it is indeed very important to have a plaincolored centre.

    But I will use the blocks for potholders, so it was not for nothing.

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  138. 89
    Amy says:

    Alert! You’ve been blogged :) Ran across your blog when I was writing a little post on string quilts, so I included a link to your tutorial. Hope you don’t mind. Happy quilting!

  139. 90
    julie ong says:

    Hi, I’ve been looking thro your blog almost everyday since I discover it bout 2 weeks agovvand I just can’t help it! I just love it. Your blog is simply wonderful. I love patchwork and quilts. I got alot of fabulous tips from your blog. Thank you so much BRAVO for the good job done!

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  141. 91

    Thank you so much for this tutorial, the end result is beautiful. I really love all of your work and your giraffe rattles has to be my favorite. I will have to try out a lot of your tutorials soon.

  142. 92
    Kristin says:

    THANK YOU for this tutorial! I just recieved 5 garbage bags of quilt cotton and scraps on Freecycle and wasn’t sure how to use them all now that I’ve sorted them. THIS is what I will be doing with them for sure! LOVE IT! Thank you for sharing!

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  144. 93
    Tonya says:

    Thank you for this lovely tutorial! I have spent an hour or so on your blog this morning after finding it on stumbleupon! I will definitely be back. You make such beautiful quilts! I’ve done paper piecing in the past but didn’t think about shortening the stitch length…genius!

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  146. 94
    Kim H says:

    I absolutely LOVE this tutorial. It’s going to the top of my list of things to try. Thanks!

  147. 95
    Rita says:

    You are amazing. All of your pieces are so inspiring!! When I found the string quilt tutorial I rushed to my room & pulled all scraps & started cutting. What fun & so quick! I love your colors!
    Thanks for your blog…..I enjoy all of it!

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  150. 96
    Allison says:

    Thanks for posting this tutorial. I have seen many quilting tutorials in recent weeks and they all seem really complex as the instructions are really wordy but this has to be the most simple one to follow that I’ve seen! I am in the mood for having a go at this now!

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  153. 97
  154. 98
    Cindy Nelson says:

    I so like your photography, quilts, tutorials and would love to have that pile of scraps…

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  157. 99
    Jackie says:

    I’d love to win, I’m looking through books/magazines trying to decide what my next quilt project will be.

  158. 100
    Lindsey says:

    AWESOME tutorial!! I did a block while my kids were still asleep this morning (so nice and quiet) and it came out perfectly! Thank you so much!

  159. 101
    Fran says:

    Wonderful string quilt tutorial…the way you lay down the white strip makes the block so special….I also like the idea that you cut strips and not just sew down any random piece of fabric like I have seen on another site! Your design beats out the best!

  160. 102
    Kit says:

    I’m about to begin my first string quilt project. I love your quilts and this tute, but I have a question: do you always use the paper pieced method for your string quilts? – and – do you have any problems with the exactness of your squares after you’ve removed the paper foundation? I know it was two questions! Thanks.

  161. 103
    Lournetta says:

    Oh this is wonderful. I love how the mixed materials come together in this block. I need to make a baby quilt. My nephew is having his first child this summer and this is perfect. Especially since they want to wait to know the sex of the child.
    Thanks for the tutorial

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  163. 104
    Diane says:

    I love the quilt and started cutting my papers. Before I start sewing I have 2 questions:

    -when you press the seams, do you alternate (out & then in)?
    -I am assuming only the center whites line up

    As you can tell I’m a noivce.

    Thanks, diane

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  167. 106
    Sylvia says:

    Using paper is a great idea for the backing. A great place to pick up paper is at your doctors office. When you leave the exam room the nurse usuallly tears off the paper covering the exam table and throws it out. Do her the favor and tear it of your self, fold it up and take it with you. Most times it is not soiled. I told the nurse and she thought it was great. Its not going into the land fill, at least not b4 its used for something else. Can’t wait to use up the many boxes of scraps I have. Thanks.

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  173. 107

    This is the best website I found for string Quilt. Now if I could just watch it being made. Thank you so much.

  174. 108
    gail says:

    I never knew until I read this what paper piecing was and I didn’t think it would apply to a new quilter like me — thanks for giving me an education!

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  179. 109

    HI Ashley, I have decided to use your wonderful scrappy tutorial for my December Quilting Sew along, for the Justice and Liberty flicker group, the quilt will be donated to the charity for military families. I love this fun funky block and have enjoyed the flicker group too. I have directed everyone to your tutorial blog. Thank you again.

  180. 110
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  183. 111
    mary cyrus says:

    Nice tute. I just wanted to say that after I use my gain dryer sheets, I save them and use them instead of paper for strip quilt blocks.

  184. 112

    Thank you so much for all your fantastic inspiration.
    This tutorial is brilliant.
    I just wondered if I could make a similar block but using a selvedge either side of the central strip, followed by more strings. Would that work?

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  186. 113
    Judijo says:

    I have never tried quilting before (beyond a hotpad) but I have at least 15 sheets of paper at work that just get thrown in a shredder. I began cutting away the 2.5 inches of “personal information” and taking them home and sewing strips of scrap on them. Then I started buying remnants. THEN I started buying custom “remnants” on Ebay. Now I am an addict. LOL

    There is NO rhyme nor reason to the size nor the angle of the strips, as long as they attach and remain a square when I tear away the paper. I have about 60 squares done. 45-50 more to go. It will end up being a “Senior” quilt for my daughter to take with her to college. (my son got a knitted afghan…this is MUCH easier, so far.)

    Thanks for the inspiration.

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  190. 114
    mickey says:

    Thank you so much for the tutorial. I have looked everywhere for nearly 13 years for a easy to understand tutorial (my mother was teaching me this when she passed away and I couldn’t for the life of me remember how she showed me to do it) So again, thank you very much~

  191. 115
    jen nock says:

    This is so informative, thank you. I’m going to have a group start a string quilt for Quilt of Valor, we are just starting, we will have to buy fabric. In all instructions that I’ve checked out scraps are being used, but I want to make sure we have enough fabric. If we do a 64″ by 96″ about how many yards do you think it would take with 1 1/2″ to 3″ strips
    how do I figure this out with all those seams ??

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  196. 116
    Yesha McKenzie says:

    If instead of paper you use a square of backing fabric topped with a square of batting and sew the strips onto this, the same easy method is used but it becomes a “quilt-as-you-go” square. All that is left to be done is the joining of the finished squares!

  197. Pingback: A String Quilt in the Making, Part 3 (Coming Together) | Stitches and Sweets

  198. 117
    Carrie says:

    Yay! A project for my scraps… psych! I HAD to feature this on my blog at http://whittskitsfabricscrafts.blogspot.com/2013/03/find-it-for-free-on-friday-5-free-quilt.html and can’t wait to try it!!
    Carrie

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  200. 118
    Suzi says:

    Try using used fabric sheets for your base —— not only do they hold up well washing after washing but they also add the bonus of a soft fragrance. Press each sheet and either use them as rectangles (I do) or cut them into measured squares. You’ll be amazed and totally hooked. Thanks so much for the tute ….. clear and concise!

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  202. 119
    Lindielee says:

    Love the thin lattes strips on this quilt. Is there a tutorial for that? Is it Quilt as you go method?

  203. Pingback: Strippy Quilt Blocks | Mad About Patchwork

  204. 120
    Darlene Lehman says:

    I am amazed!! Thank you for the tips. I have shied away from quilting recently because of all the fine-finger work and stitching involved; this sounds do-able!!

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  210. 121
    Janice says:

    What sort of paper do you suggest to used in strip patchwork quilting?

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  217. 122
    Reba Bever says:

    i noticed this on Pinterest. its very similar to what i do (but i never thought of consistent center). the only difference is i use material instead of paper therefore eliminating tearing away because it becomes part of the quilt. an old threadbare sheet or scraps that i cute into the size blocks i want work great.

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  219. 123
    Mary Pitman says:

    I have a quilt made this way that a little lady gave me to quilt. She had made the top. It is one of my greatest tresures. Just love the way it looks, with the strip in middle, made it look so neat. I wondered how it was done.

  220. 124
    Barbara says:

    I would very much like to make your Ruby Strings quilt but I’m not able to understand how the pdf chart works. I know how to make string blocks, and I’ve read your instructions over and over and I’m unable to relate them to the chart. Can you unstick me, give me an interpretation of the blocks on the chart? Thanks a bunch.

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